City of London sows wildflower meadow to cut carbon – EnvironmentJournal

A 42-acre wildflower meadow has been planted in the land surrounding Epping Forest, as part of a new City of London Corporation program to fight climate change.

The prairie was sown as part of the City of London Corporation’s new carbon removal project, which aims to remove carbon from the atmosphere by creating new wildlife habitats in its open spaces.

The project is part of the City Corporation’s broader climate action strategy, which is committed to achieving net zero carbon emissions for its own operations by 2027 and supporting the achievement of the net zero goal for the entire square mile by 2040.

The wildflower meadow was planted at Patmore’s Field in High Beach, on previously cultivated but low-quality arable land, with the aim of locking in atmospheric carbon in the soil beneath the new permanent meadow and boosting biodiversity by creating new habitats for a range of species.

City of London Corporation Epping Forest and Commons Chairman Graeme Doshi-Smith said: “Scientific evidence shows that the climate is already changing and we must act now if we are to limit global warming.

“Climate change is a serious problem that affects everyone on the planet. And it is clear that green spaces can play a major role in reducing carbon in the atmosphere. This project demonstrates our commitment to tackling this global problem at the local level and it is exciting to keep pace with this work. ‘

Epping Forest receives more than £ 4million per year from the City of London Corporation to preserve the environment, attracting 4.5 million visits per year.

The forest has over a million trees, including 50,000 ancient beech, hornbeam and oak tadpoles, as well as around 500 rare and endangered insect species.

The new grassland is close to other flower-rich meadows of the forest, which will increase the value of the forest to wildlife, for example by providing greater connectivity to pollinating insects.

Photo by Eddy Boom


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Chris B. Hall

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